My mother once told me that trauma is like Lord of the Rings. You go through this crazy, life-altering thing that almost kills you (like say having to drop the one ring into Mount Doom), and that thing by definition cannot possibly be understood by someone who hasn’t gone through it. They can sympathize sure, but they’ll never really know, and more than likely they’ll expect you to move on from the thing fairly quickly. And they can’t be blamed, people are just like that, but that’s not how it works.

Some lucky people are like Sam. They can go straight home, get married, have a whole bunch of curly headed Hobbit babies and pick up their gardening right where they left off, content to forget the whole thing and live out their days in peace. Lots of people however, are like Frodo, and they don’t come home the same person they were when they left, and everything is more horrible and more hard then it ever was before. The old wounds sting and the ghost of the weight of the one ring still weighs heavy on their minds, and they don’t fit in at home anymore, so they get on boats go sailing away to the Undying West to look for the sort of peace that can only come from within. Frodos can’t cope, and most of us are Frodos when we start out.

But if we move past the urge to hide or lash out, my mother always told me, we can become Pippin and Merry. They never ignored what had happened to them, but they were malleable and receptive to change. They became civic leaders and great storytellers; they we able to turn all that fear and anger and grief into narratives that others could delight in and learn from, and they used the skills they had learned in battle to protect their homeland. They were fortified by what had happened to them, they wore it like armor and used it to their advantage.

It is our trauma that turns us into guardians, my mother told me, it is suffering that strengthens our skin and softens our hearts, and if we learn to live with the ghosts of what had been done to us, we just may be able to save others from the same fate.

S.T.Gibson (via sarahtaylorgibson)
faitherinhicks:

bryankonietzko:

Faith Erin Hicks graciously gave me an original, gorgeous page from her ATLA Free Comic Book Day issue for Dark Horse. I love her inking style, so this is a real treat to see up close.

:D

faitherinhicks:

bryankonietzko:

Faith Erin Hicks graciously gave me an original, gorgeous page from her ATLA Free Comic Book Day issue for Dark Horse. I love her inking style, so this is a real treat to see up close.

:D

iguanamouth:

cheppo:

iguanamouth:

together at last

excuse me i have something important 2 add

image

image

hes here

elkoi:

blatentidiocy:

Just Breathe Dress - Ever After

Beautiful dress

makanidotdot:

image

it keeps happening

zealous4fashion:

Jean Louis Sabaji Spring Summer 2014 Collection (1/3)
highlandvalley:

Twitter / Minoru0320: 太陽の顏 (´Д`) …

x-file:

catazoid:

As promised, here are some pictures of Lyalya’s first walk outside! Look at the bushy little squirrel tail :D the sandpit was her favorite spot! She was extremely excited and threw sand all over the place

this is a fucking squirrel. this is a fucking squirrel with a cat’s head. who is responsible for this

smitethepatriarchy:

greenthepress:

smartercities:

Meet The 14-Year-Old Girl Who Developed A Low-Cost Water Purification System | FastCompany
The next generation of scientists is already hard at work solving our biggest problems. Take Deepika Kurup, a 14-year-old high school student from Nashua, New Hampshire. After seeing children in India drinking dirty water from a stagnant pool, she decided, in her words, “to find a solution to the global water crisis.” And then she actually made some progress towards that goal, developing a solar-powered water purification system.

She is the future

Ever notice how it’s always brilliant teenagers making stuff that will actually solve the world’s worst problems, like what do adults even do?

smitethepatriarchy:

greenthepress:

smartercities:

Meet The 14-Year-Old Girl Who Developed A Low-Cost Water Purification System | FastCompany

The next generation of scientists is already hard at work solving our biggest problems. Take Deepika Kurup, a 14-year-old high school student from Nashua, New Hampshire. After seeing children in India drinking dirty water from a stagnant pool, she decided, in her words, “to find a solution to the global water crisis.” And then she actually made some progress towards that goal, developing a solar-powered water purification system.

She is the future

Ever notice how it’s always brilliant teenagers making stuff that will actually solve the world’s worst problems, like what do adults even do?